Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

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Topic author
bcolombo
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed May 03, 2017 11:44 am

Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by bcolombo » Fri Aug 30, 2019 3:18 pm

Since you've come to the emergency forum, we know you want a fast answer to your question. In order for us to figure out the problem as quickly as possible, we ask that you answer the following questions as best you can. Some of them may seem odd, but they're all designed to give us the information we need to give you a good solution for your problem. The things in the [ brackets ] are there to make this post easier to read once submitted. Thanks!


1. What kind of substrate is used in your tank and how deep is it?

Fluker's All Natural Premium Sand Substrate Mixture; natural sand, coconut fiber, calcium carbonate, sea salt mix. It's about 6 inches deep, maybe a bit more. 20 gallon tank.

2. Do you have gauges in the tank to measure temperature and humidity? If so, where are they located and what temperature and humidity do they usually read?

Yes, I have a digital gauge on the side near the top. Humidity is usually between 75%-80%, temp around 70 degrees.

3. Is a heat source used in the tank? If so, what?

We have a Zoo Med heater, 4 watts - a pad that adhere's to the bottom of the tank, in one corner.

4. What types of water are available (fresh or salt) and how is the water treated (what brands of dechlorinator or salt mix and what ratio is used to mix it)?

We have both salt and fresh water. I'm not home now, so I don't remember the exact brand -- but when we got our crabs I researched this site. We dechlorinate tap water and add salt to the that. Pretty sure the salt mixture had the word "Ocean" in the title. Dechlorinate with some drops, can't remember the name.

5. What kinds of food do you feed and how often is it replaced?

We are not great with variety and it's probably not the best diet. We always have popcorn (we pop, no salt) and a Zoo Med hermit crab mineral block available. The block stays around for a while, but the popcorn is replaced daily (what's left over). We add strawberry tops/leaves, shredded chicken, cut up grapes, blueberries (they don't like these). Sometimes peanut butter. A few other things sometimes, but these are the basics.

6. How long have you had the crab and what species is it, if known?

We have (maybe had?) three crabs for three years. Don't know the species.

7. Has your crab molted, and how long ago did it happen?

All three crabs have molted many times. Not sure when the last time was that Charles molted - he's the problem crab.

8. What type of housing are the crabs kept in, what size is it and what kind of lid is on the housing?

20 gallon glass aquarium, mesh top. We cover most of the top with a dish towel to help keep humidity in.

9. How many crabs are in the tank and about how large are they?

Three crabs. I don't know how to judge the size, but all three have grown a lot since they were babies. They are large enough that I have to now research where to buy larger shells, since most of the shells from pet shops are getting a little small for them.

10. How many extra shells are usually kept in the tank, if any?

Three extra shells.

11. Have there been any fumes or chemicals near the crabitat recently?

No.

12. How often do you clean the tank and how?

You got me here. I haven't really cleaned the tank before. When we adopted the crabs, we started out with a 10 gallon tank and quickly realized that was too small. So we moved up to 20 gallon. I guess I need to figure out how to clean it sometime...

13. Are sponges used in the water dish? If so, how are they cleaned?

No. We used sponges in the very beginning, but haven't used them for years. Crabs are able to climb in/out of the water dishes easily.

14. Has anything new been added to your crabitat recently?

No.

15. Is there any other information you would like to share that might be helpful (anything that is regularly part of your crab care, playtime, bathing, etc.)?

We are not very good parents. My son (their "dad") is a little scared to hold them, so we just basically are happy to watch them whenever we are all awake/active at the same time.

16. Please describe the emergency situation in detail.

Charles was our first crab. We got him three years ago and he has molted/grown normally. He was always our friendliest crab. Over the past 6-9 months, we have seen him much less frequently. Starting in about March, we hadn't seen him at all. In April, when we were travelling, I realized that at least one of the crabs was molting. So instead of bringing them with us, we asked a neighbor to take care of them and left them all home. I can't really remember, but I don't think it was Charles that was molting then.

In May, we had to dig up the crabs to go away for the summer. Two were fine. I had a lot of trouble finding the third, which turned out to be Charles. I wasn't even sure it was him. His shell was heavy, but the opening seemed to be packed tightly with sand. (I hadn't seen a shell like that before with a crab inside. Sometimes our extra shells are buried and full of sand.) I wanted to make sure that Charles was actually in there, so I picked at the sand around the opening to the shell a bit and it did look like there were some crab legs there. I didn't have a good feeling about things, but we needed to leave. I put Charles in our small plastic travel aquarium with the other two crabs. He didn't move during our trip.

When we got to the house, I put the other two crabs in their 20 gallon tank (duplicate from home) and left Charles in the small travel tank. I lightly buried him, left him food and water, sprayed daily, but there was no heat source. After a few weeks of nothing, I was pretty sure he was dead, but there was no smell. This went on all summer - no signs of Charles, no food eaten, no signs of life. Now that summer is over, I asked my son if it was okay to dig him up and take another look. He was right where I left him, near the surface. I swished him around in water to get some of the sand out of the opening of the shell. Whatever is in the shell, assuming it's Charles, looks like a dried up black mummy. We have not tried to dig him out of the shell. He obviously hasn't moved.

QUESTION: We want to bury Charles, but my son is worried that maybe he's not dead. His concern is that there was never any "fishy" smell. No smell at all. My son asked me to "ask the experts" for their thoughts, so I promised to post. I guess my only questions are "What would cause a hermit crab to shrivel up and die?" and "When a hermit crab dies, does it ALWAYS smell fishy?"

Thank you all very much for any thoughts. This is a great forum. Sorry for the long post.


.

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JoeHermits
Posts: 561
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:26 pm

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by JoeHermits » Fri Aug 30, 2019 8:56 pm

No, hermit crabs don’t always smell. If they dry out they may not have an obvious scent.

If he looks like a mummy, he probably is a mummy. I’m sorry.


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curlysister
Posts: 1310
Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2010 3:54 pm
Location: Manitoba, Canada

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by curlysister » Sat Aug 31, 2019 11:01 am

1. What kind of substrate is used in your tank and how deep is it?

Fluker's All Natural Premium Sand Substrate Mixture; natural sand, coconut fiber, calcium carbonate, sea salt mix. It's about 6 inches deep, maybe a bit more. 20 gallon tank.
Curly - Is it moist enough to hold it's shape?

2. Do you have gauges in the tank to measure temperature and humidity? If so, where are they located and what temperature and humidity do they usually read?

Yes, I have a digital gauge on the side near the top. Humidity is usually between 75%-80%, temp around 70 degrees.
Curly - It would be better to put your gauge at the surface where the crabs hang out more. 70 degrees is a bit low for temp.

3. Is a heat source used in the tank? If so, what?

We have a Zoo Med heater, 4 watts - a pad that adhere's to the bottom of the tank, in one corner.
Curly - Even though they are called Under Tank Heaters, they must never be under the tank for hermit crabs. Always on the back or the side of the tank. If on the bottom, they can create heat pockets in the sub that can kill a crab.

4. What types of water are available (fresh or salt) and how is the water treated (what brands of dechlorinator or salt mix and what ratio is used to mix it)?

We have both salt and fresh water. I'm not home now, so I don't remember the exact brand -- but when we got our crabs I researched this site. We dechlorinate tap water and add salt to the that. Pretty sure the salt mixture had the word "Ocean" in the title. Dechlorinate with some drops, can't remember the name.
Curly - Prime is the dechlorinator most recommended, and Instant Ocean the salt. Sounds like these are what you may have.

5. What kinds of food do you feed and how often is it replaced?

We are not great with variety and it's probably not the best diet. We always have popcorn (we pop, no salt) and a Zoo Med hermit crab mineral block available. The block stays around for a while, but the popcorn is replaced daily (what's left over). We add strawberry tops/leaves, shredded chicken, cut up grapes, blueberries (they don't like these). Sometimes peanut butter. A few other things sometimes, but these are the basics.
Curly - I would get rid of the mineral block and give them a cuttle bone for calcium instead. The mineral block has preservatives that are probably not good. Popcorn is okay as an occasional treat, but not a staple. Crabs need a variety of good organic foods, including calcium and protein daily. Check the 'food care sheet' for lots of good info and the food pyramid, as well as the safe and unsafe food list. Most commercial foods aren't safe for crabs, even though they are marketed for them.

6. How long have you had the crab and what species is it, if known?

We have (maybe had?) three crabs for three years. Don't know the species.

7. Has your crab molted, and how long ago did it happen?

All three crabs have molted many times. Not sure when the last time was that Charles molted - he's the problem crab.

8. What type of housing are the crabs kept in, what size is it and what kind of lid is on the housing?

20 gallon glass aquarium, mesh top. We cover most of the top with a dish towel to help keep humidity in.
Curly - A towel isn't great for keeping humidity in - plastic wrap works much better.

9. How many crabs are in the tank and about how large are they?

Three crabs. I don't know how to judge the size, but all three have grown a lot since they were babies. They are large enough that I have to now research where to buy larger shells, since most of the shells from pet shops are getting a little small for them.

10. How many extra shells are usually kept in the tank, if any?

Three extra shells.
Curly - HCA recommends 3-5 extra shells per crab. With three crabs, you should have between 9 and 15 extra shells.

11. Have there been any fumes or chemicals near the crabitat recently?

No.

12. How often do you clean the tank and how?

You got me here. I haven't really cleaned the tank before. When we adopted the crabs, we started out with a 10 gallon tank and quickly realized that was too small. So we moved up to 20 gallon. I guess I need to figure out how to clean it sometime...
Curly - You aren't doing anything wrong. Only spot cleaning is needed. The entire sub does not need to be removed and tank cleaned, unless there is an emergency such as a flood or bacterial bloom.

13. Are sponges used in the water dish? If so, how are they cleaned?

No. We used sponges in the very beginning, but haven't used them for years. Crabs are able to climb in/out of the water dishes easily.
Curly - You are correct that sponges are not needed. But the water dishes should be deep enough that the crabs can fully submerge, and also have a way for them to climb out.

14. Has anything new been added to your crabitat recently?

No.

15. Is there any other information you would like to share that might be helpful (anything that is regularly part of your crab care, playtime, bathing, etc.)?

We are not very good parents. My son (their "dad") is a little scared to hold them, so we just basically are happy to watch them whenever we are all awake/active at the same time.
Curly - Most of us recommend a hands-off approach. So watching them from outside the tank is very appropriate!

16. Please describe the emergency situation in detail.

Charles was our first crab. We got him three years ago and he has molted/grown normally. He was always our friendliest crab. Over the past 6-9 months, we have seen him much less frequently. Starting in about March, we hadn't seen him at all. In April, when we were travelling, I realized that at least one of the crabs was molting. So instead of bringing them with us, we asked a neighbor to take care of them and left them all home. I can't really remember, but I don't think it was Charles that was molting then.

In May, we had to dig up the crabs to go away for the summer. Two were fine. I had a lot of trouble finding the third, which turned out to be Charles. I wasn't even sure it was him. His shell was heavy, but the opening seemed to be packed tightly with sand. (I hadn't seen a shell like that before with a crab inside. Sometimes our extra shells are buried and full of sand.) I wanted to make sure that Charles was actually in there, so I picked at the sand around the opening to the shell a bit and it did look like there were some crab legs there. I didn't have a good feeling about things, but we needed to leave. I put Charles in our small plastic travel aquarium with the other two crabs. He didn't move during our trip.

When we got to the house, I put the other two crabs in their 20 gallon tank (duplicate from home) and left Charles in the small travel tank. I lightly buried him, left him food and water, sprayed daily, but there was no heat source. After a few weeks of nothing, I was pretty sure he was dead, but there was no smell. This went on all summer - no signs of Charles, no food eaten, no signs of life. Now that summer is over, I asked my son if it was okay to dig him up and take another look. He was right where I left him, near the surface. I swished him around in water to get some of the sand out of the opening of the shell. Whatever is in the shell, assuming it's Charles, looks like a dried up black mummy. We have not tried to dig him out of the shell. He obviously hasn't moved.

QUESTION: We want to bury Charles, but my son is worried that maybe he's not dead. His concern is that there was never any "fishy" smell. No smell at all. My son asked me to "ask the experts" for their thoughts, so I promised to post. I guess my only questions are "What would cause a hermit crab to shrivel up and die?" and "When a hermit crab dies, does it ALWAYS smell fishy?"
Curly - No, a crab doesn't always smell fishy. It does, unfortunately, sound like he is deceased. And that he likely was when you originally dug him up. It could be that he just ran out of energy and passed away. Or he could have been in a heat pocket from the heater under the tank. Or his molting cave may have collapsed. Digging up a crab always has the possibility of interrupting their molt at a critical time, and can be a cause of death, which is why it is not recommended - although it does sound like he may have been dead already. If you do need to dig up a crab in future, do not re-bury it. The crab will need to be isolated from the other crabs, but still in ideal conditions with heat and humidity, until strong enough to be with the crowd. When they molt, they make a cave under the substrate. Until their new exo has hardened, they are soft and vulnerable and smell like food to the other crabs.

Thank you all very much for any thoughts. This is a great forum. Sorry for the long post.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." -Will Rogers


Topic author
bcolombo
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed May 03, 2017 11:44 am

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by bcolombo » Sat Aug 31, 2019 12:53 pm

curlysister wrote:
Sat Aug 31, 2019 11:01 am
1. What kind of substrate is used in your tank and how deep is it?

Fluker's All Natural Premium Sand Substrate Mixture; natural sand, coconut fiber, calcium carbonate, sea salt mix. It's about 6 inches deep, maybe a bit more. 20 gallon tank.
Curly - Is it moist enough to hold it's shape?

BETTE: Yes - it is plenty moist.

2. Do you have gauges in the tank to measure temperature and humidity? If so, where are they located and what temperature and humidity do they usually read?

Yes, I have a digital gauge on the side near the top. Humidity is usually between 75%-80%, temp around 70 degrees.
Curly - It would be better to put your gauge at the surface where the crabs hang out more. 70 degrees is a bit low for temp.

BETTE: I wasn't near the tank when I posted this, so the temp is probably higher than 70 degrees. I was nervous about putting it closer to the crabs because it sticks on the side and I was worried that it might fall.

3. Is a heat source used in the tank? If so, what?

We have a Zoo Med heater, 4 watts - a pad that adhere's to the bottom of the tank, in one corner.
Curly - Even though they are called Under Tank Heaters, they must never be under the tank for hermit crabs. Always on the back or the side of the tank. If on the bottom, they can create heat pockets in the sub that can kill a crab.

BETTE: Good advice. As I mentioned, we have two locations and two set-ups. For one (where we are now), the heater is underneath. For our main tank, it is on the side (but used to be underneath). I can relocate .

4. What types of water are available (fresh or salt) and how is the water treated (what brands of dechlorinator or salt mix and what ratio is used to mix it)?

We have both salt and fresh water. I'm not home now, so I don't remember the exact brand -- but when we got our crabs I researched this site. We dechlorinate tap water and add salt to the that. Pretty sure the salt mixture had the word "Ocean" in the title. Dechlorinate with some drops, can't remember the name.
Curly - Prime is the dechlorinator most recommended, and Instant Ocean the salt. Sounds like these are what you may have.

BETTE: YES! Those are the names of the products we use to treat the water.

5. What kinds of food do you feed and how often is it replaced?

We are not great with variety and it's probably not the best diet. We always have popcorn (we pop, no salt) and a Zoo Med hermit crab mineral block available. The block stays around for a while, but the popcorn is replaced daily (what's left over). We add strawberry tops/leaves, shredded chicken, cut up grapes, blueberries (they don't like these). Sometimes peanut butter. A few other things sometimes, but these are the basics.
Curly - I would get rid of the mineral block and give them a cuttle bone for calcium instead. The mineral block has preservatives that are probably not good. Popcorn is okay as an occasional treat, but not a staple. Crabs need a variety of good organic foods, including calcium and protein daily. Check the 'food care sheet' for lots of good info and the food pyramid, as well as the safe and unsafe food list. Most commercial foods aren't safe for crabs, even though they are marketed for them.

BETTE: OK, I'll get rid of the mineral blocks and get a cuttle bone. Also promise to feed them better. Does this mean I can't feed my son chicken fingers every night as well?

6. How long have you had the crab and what species is it, if known?

We have (maybe had?) three crabs for three years. Don't know the species.

7. Has your crab molted, and how long ago did it happen?

All three crabs have molted many times. Not sure when the last time was that Charles molted - he's the problem crab.

8. What type of housing are the crabs kept in, what size is it and what kind of lid is on the housing?

20 gallon glass aquarium, mesh top. We cover most of the top with a dish towel to help keep humidity in.
Curly - A towel isn't great for keeping humidity in - plastic wrap works much better.

BETTE: Actually, we have plastic wrap on one tank and a towel over the other. I'll put plastic wrap on both. Also, I assume we need to leave some space at the edges to let air in, correct?

9. How many crabs are in the tank and about how large are they?

Three crabs. I don't know how to judge the size, but all three have grown a lot since they were babies. They are large enough that I have to now research where to buy larger shells, since most of the shells from pet shops are getting a little small for them.

10. How many extra shells are usually kept in the tank, if any?

Three extra shells.
Curly - HCA recommends 3-5 extra shells per crab. With three crabs, you should have between 9 and 15 extra shells.

BETTE: OMG. Honestly, it sounds like we would need a larger tank to have a dozen shells hanging around in there. Also, I need to figure out where to get shells on the larger size. I ordered online once and they were all tiny.

11. Have there been any fumes or chemicals near the crabitat recently?

No.

12. How often do you clean the tank and how?

You got me here. I haven't really cleaned the tank before. When we adopted the crabs, we started out with a 10 gallon tank and quickly realized that was too small. So we moved up to 20 gallon. I guess I need to figure out how to clean it sometime...
Curly - You aren't doing anything wrong. Only spot cleaning is needed. The entire sub does not need to be removed and tank cleaned, unless there is an emergency such as a flood or bacterial bloom.

13. Are sponges used in the water dish? If so, how are they cleaned?

No. We used sponges in the very beginning, but haven't used them for years. Crabs are able to climb in/out of the water dishes easily.
Curly - You are correct that sponges are not needed. But the water dishes should be deep enough that the crabs can fully submerge, and also have a way for them to climb out.

BETTE: Another example of me thinking I was doing things right. Our water dishes are not deep enough to cover the entire shell, but hopefully that's not what you mean. Do we really need to get water dishes that are 1.5-2 inches deep?

14. Has anything new been added to your crabitat recently?

No.

15. Is there any other information you would like to share that might be helpful (anything that is regularly part of your crab care, playtime, bathing, etc.)?

We are not very good parents. My son (their "dad") is a little scared to hold them, so we just basically are happy to watch them whenever we are all awake/active at the same time.
Curly - Most of us recommend a hands-off approach. So watching them from outside the tank is very appropriate!

16. Please describe the emergency situation in detail.

Charles was our first crab. We got him three years ago and he has molted/grown normally. He was always our friendliest crab. Over the past 6-9 months, we have seen him much less frequently. Starting in about March, we hadn't seen him at all. In April, when we were travelling, I realized that at least one of the crabs was molting. So instead of bringing them with us, we asked a neighbor to take care of them and left them all home. I can't really remember, but I don't think it was Charles that was molting then.

In May, we had to dig up the crabs to go away for the summer. Two were fine. I had a lot of trouble finding the third, which turned out to be Charles. I wasn't even sure it was him. His shell was heavy, but the opening seemed to be packed tightly with sand. (I hadn't seen a shell like that before with a crab inside. Sometimes our extra shells are buried and full of sand.) I wanted to make sure that Charles was actually in there, so I picked at the sand around the opening to the shell a bit and it did look like there were some crab legs there. I didn't have a good feeling about things, but we needed to leave. I put Charles in our small plastic travel aquarium with the other two crabs. He didn't move during our trip.

When we got to the house, I put the other two crabs in their 20 gallon tank (duplicate from home) and left Charles in the small travel tank. I lightly buried him, left him food and water, sprayed daily, but there was no heat source. After a few weeks of nothing, I was pretty sure he was dead, but there was no smell. This went on all summer - no signs of Charles, no food eaten, no signs of life. Now that summer is over, I asked my son if it was okay to dig him up and take another look. He was right where I left him, near the surface. I swished him around in water to get some of the sand out of the opening of the shell. Whatever is in the shell, assuming it's Charles, looks like a dried up black mummy. We have not tried to dig him out of the shell. He obviously hasn't moved.

QUESTION: We want to bury Charles, but my son is worried that maybe he's not dead. His concern is that there was never any "fishy" smell. No smell at all. My son asked me to "ask the experts" for their thoughts, so I promised to post. I guess my only questions are "What would cause a hermit crab to shrivel up and die?" and "When a hermit crab dies, does it ALWAYS smell fishy?"
Curly - No, a crab doesn't always smell fishy. It does, unfortunately, sound like he is deceased. And that he likely was when you originally dug him up. It could be that he just ran out of energy and passed away. Or he could have been in a heat pocket from the heater under the tank. Or his molting cave may have collapsed. Digging up a crab always has the possibility of interrupting their molt at a critical time, and can be a cause of death, which is why it is not recommended - although it does sound like he may have been dead already. If you do need to dig up a crab in future, do not re-bury it. The crab will need to be isolated from the other crabs, but still in ideal conditions with heat and humidity, until strong enough to be with the crowd. When they molt, they make a cave under the substrate. Until their new exo has hardened, they are soft and vulnerable and smell like food to the other crabs.

BETTE: We unknowingly dug up Charles two years ago just before a molt. It was our first molt ever. We ended up just keeping him in isolation on the surface and were able to see a surface molt. Super cool and a little gross (the slimy crab). In this case, Charles wasn't near the heat source, so I guess it was just his time. RIP.

BETTE: One last thing. Now that we are down to two crabs, do we need to get a third? They don't seem to pay any attention to each other, but I recall reading that they are "social" and can get lonely. Is two enough?

Thank you so much for all this information! We will try hard to be better parents, especially giving them better food choices.

Thank you all very much for any thoughts. This is a great forum. Sorry for the long post.

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DragonsFly
Posts: 646
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 7:27 pm
Location: Jonesboro, AR

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by DragonsFly » Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:53 pm

Iso on the surface was the right thing to do when you unknowingly dug up a molter. Re-burying is not a good idea, since you can't form a cave for them, but as others have said, it sounds as if he may not have survived anyway. :(

Two crabs are fine; the two famous crabs that (so far) lived the longest in captivity (about 30 years!) were just a pair. Especially if you can't give them a larger tank than a 20g anytime soon, I definitely would not add more. But yeah, with respect to getting larger tanks eventually: as they grow, even two crabs are going to want a lot more space. Remember that these are wild animals that travel for miles every night in the wild, and as they get bigger, they will need deeper substrate, so larger tanks become a must by the time you need 12 inches of substrate!

And yes, it's best to have water sources that are deep enough for them to fully submerge, so they can best regulate their shell water. These can be made cheaply with food storage containers, some plastic needlework canvas (for "climb-outs), and zip ties (poke a hole in the side of the food storage container near the top, and use a zip tie to secure the needlework canvas to the side of the container).

You are doing all the right things in trying to learn more about the best ways to keep your crabs. Even people who have been keeping them for decades are always learning more; just keep learning and improving their home and conditions little by little. :)
--{}: Dragons Fly Farm --{}:
Resident PP's:"Major Tom" "Billie Jean" & "Mr. Jones"
MT and BJ jumbos now. Everybody excited to move somewhere warm and beachy.


Topic author
bcolombo
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed May 03, 2017 11:44 am

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by bcolombo » Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:39 pm

Thank you so much for you reply ... I just saw it! I'm not sure I have it in me to take care of 30 year old hermit crabs, but I will try!

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Hermiesguardian
Posts: 2516
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:41 pm

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by Hermiesguardian » Sat Sep 14, 2019 4:14 pm

bcolombo wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:39 pm
Thank you so much for you reply ... I just saw it! I'm not sure I have it in me to take care of 30 year old hermit crabs, but I will try!
I may have to leave mine in my will to my daughter if they live that long. She came home with them and I ended up taking care of them. Only fitting I leave them to her. Lol
raising son's dog, Dante. Husky/hound.
Raising daughter's hermit crabs, Shelder, Paras and Derek. Added 2 more of my own (of course) Pete and Stryper. Former mommy to 2 guinea pigs and beloved cat, Nissi

User avatar

DragonsFly
Posts: 646
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 7:27 pm
Location: Jonesboro, AR

Re: Pretty sure he's dead, but no fishy smell; looks like a mummy

Post by DragonsFly » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:00 pm

bcolombo wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:39 pm
Thank you so much for you reply ... I just saw it! I'm not sure I have it in me to take care of 30 year old hermit crabs, but I will try!
Yeah; I doubt very many people would be, really! But this is just one of many things they don't tell you when they sell these animals as "pets." Once we end up with them, all we can do is the best we can do. :)
--{}: Dragons Fly Farm --{}:
Resident PP's:"Major Tom" "Billie Jean" & "Mr. Jones"
MT and BJ jumbos now. Everybody excited to move somewhere warm and beachy.

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